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2020

The Gettysburg Address, 1863

Week of November 15
The events of July 1-3, 1863 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, forever changed the historical landscape of America. General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and Major General...

The Synod of Dort Begins, 1618

Week of November 8
Once the Protestant Reformation of the 16th Century had swept across Europe, various countries were able to stabilize their borders and establish their new-found faith, although political...

The Bolshevik Revolution Begins, 1917

Week of November 1
Russia was rocked by revolution several times during the First World War. Multiple parties vied for power, but agreed on only one policy decision—that the Tsar had to be toppled. Revolution since 1789...

The Battle of Agincourt, 1415

Week of October 25
Crispin and Crispian were Christian twins martyred for their faith c. 286 A.D. The Medieval Church added a feast day in their memory, later removed by the Second Vatican Council. Ironically, a number...

The Death of Archibald Alexander, 1851

Week of October 18
In centuries past, the name given an individual at birth often had significant meaning. Among Scottish families, Archibald and Alexander were common and had strong definitional and historic...

The Death of Obadiah Holmes, 1682

Week of October 11
The little band of Puritan dissenters crammed into the diminutive Mayflower made landfall in 1620, naming their colony Plimoth. Ten years later, with King Charles I on the throne, ten percent of the...

The Birth of Rutherford B. Hayes, 1822

Week of October 4
It was called the most corrupt election in American history. Electoral votes from Florida, South Carolina, and Louisiana, where bayonet-enforced Republican governments barely clung to power, were delayed...

New York City Revival, 1857

Week of September 20
What historians have deemed “The Second Great Awakening”—a wide-spread religious revival in America—began around the turn of the 19th Century and continued sporadically in different...

The Battle of Antietam, 1862

Week of September 13
After fifteen months of brutal combat—stretching from Arizona Territory to the eastern seaboard, as well as across the Atlantic Ocean—Union and Confederate armies met in the rolling countryside...

The Battle of Lake Erie, 1813

Week of September 6
The most unpopular war in American history took place from 1812 to 1815 between the United States and Great Britain. It was so unpopular that New England representatives met in Hartford...

The Baptism of Karl Marx, 1824

Week of August 23
Two sets of Marx brothers, one of three sons, the other of five, descended respectively, from Jewish families in Prussia and Alsace. The five Marx brothers performed comedy in Vaudeville Acts...

The Birth of Napoleon Bonaparte, 1769

Week of August 9
The British called him all sorts of things: The Beast, The Monster, the Man of Blood, the Little Corporal, and Old Boney. No doubt other European nations had their special names for him. He was the most...

The Victory of William Wilberforce, 1833

Week of July 26
Providence is indeed inscrutable. Had Britain retained her American colonies in the late 18th Century, slavery might have been abolished in America by English Parliamentary legislation in...

John Day the Printer Dies, 1584

Week of July 19
When most people think about the Protestant Reformation, they think of Martin Luther and John Calvin, or other Reformers, or their aristocratic benefactors who enabled the preaching of the...

Royal Family of Russia Murdered, 1918

Week of July 12
Tsar Nicholas II was the last emperor of “All Russia.” He and his family were arrested during the Bolshevik Revolution which engulfed Russia in 1917. Nicholas and the German Kaiser, Wilhelm...

Mary Surratt Executed, July 7, 1865

Week of July 5
On April 14, 1865, the popular stage actor John Wilkes Booth assassinated President Abraham Lincoln. Booth was the leader of a conspiracy to kidnap the President and hold him for ransom to...

Gone with the Wind Published, 1936

Week of June 28
Does Hollywood just reflect the mores and viewpoint of the popular culture, or does it create and perpetuate the popular culture? It is an age old debate. In the case of the blockbuster 1939 film...

The Death of Justin Martyr, 166 AD

Week of May 31
There is not an abundance of reliable sources concerning individual Christians in the immediate post-apostolic era (i.e. second century), but there are some. One of the best known stories, told...

The Death of William Tennent, 1746

Week of May 3
Someone taught Augustine of Hippo, someone taught John Calvin, someone taught Jonathan Edwards. Sure, they were gifted men, called by God to minister to people and gain a standing in...

Warsaw Ghetto Uprising Begins, 1943

Week of April 19
Not all battles of the Second World War (1939-1945) were fought by regular armies in the major theatres of the war. Not all the Jews and other hated minorities went quietly to their deaths...

Christmas Evans Wrestles with God, 1802

Week of April 5
Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, along with England, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Some Welshmen still speak a form of “Britonic” Gaelic, which is especially...

William H. Seward Purchases Alaska, 1868

Week of March 29
Providence surely is mysterious. But in looking back, we see the remarkable ways and means ordained of God to bring about the historical consequences. On the afternoon of April 5, 1865...

Arthur St. Clair Born, 1737

Week of March 22
There are ten towns, three counties, three streets, and a hospital in the United States, and a three-star hotel in Caithness, Scotland named after Arthur St. Clair, but if you list American generals of the War...

The Ulster Revival, 1859

Week of March 8
The North of Ireland, known collectively as Ulster, had been settled in previous centuries primarily by Scottish immigrants. Some had been brought there by the English landlords to work the land, others...

James Guthrie Arrested for Treason, 1661

Week of February 16
By the 17th century, every country in Europe possessed a state church to which everyone in their respective jurisdictions, theoretically, belonged. France, half the Germanic states, Austria, Spain...

Lott Carey Sails for Africa, 1821

Week of January 19
Lott Carey was born into a Christian family on the plantation of John Bowry, around 1780, five years into the War for American Independence. His grandmother helped raise Lott, and she was a...

The Death of Timothy Dwight, 1817

Week of January 5
Timothy Dwight IV was the oldest of thirteen children whose maternal grandfather, Jonathan Edwards, was destined to be regarded as one of the most brilliant men produced in American...