2022 | 2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016


2022

Death of Leo Tolstoy, 1910

Week of November 20
Several Russian novelists produced works that appear on almost every list of “the greatest novels ever written;” Count Lev Nickolayevich Tolstoy usually sits atop that list. On November 20, 1910...

Victory at Yorktown, 1781

Week of October 16
Few battles in history had larger repercussions than the Siege of Yorktown, Virginia, concluded on October 19, 1781. An army, representing thirteen...

Chief Joseph Surrenders, 1877

Week of October 2
Following the American War Between the States, the United States government reorganized the army after demobilizing a million men. In 1866...

The Great Jamaica Revival, 1860

Week of September 25
“I would affirm that much of the modern approach to evangelism, with its techniques and methods, is unnecessary if we really believe...

Sickness Plagues the Niger Expedition, 1841

Week of September 4
West Africa has long been known as “the white man’s graveyard,” and for obvious and deadly reasons—fatal tropical diseases have plagued Europeans along those coasts for five hundred...

Visigoths Take Rome, A.D. 410

Week of August 21
Empires and tribes come and go throughout history. The prophet Daniel boldly predicted the rise of the following few empires, each of which would succumb to a stronger foe. The last...

Japan Formally Surrenders in WWII, 1945

Week of August 28
On September 2, 1945, Japan signed the “instrument of surrender” to the Allied forces, aboard the battleship USS Missouri. The United States hoped that the war would have drawn...

Thomas Watson’s Farewell, 1662

Week of August 14
Thomas Watson was one of the best known and most reprinted preachers in England’s history. On August 17, 1662 he preached his last sermon to the congregation he had served as pastor for...

Robert Barnes Burned at the Stake, 1540

Week of July 24
Some of the early leaders and martyrs of the Protestant Reformation have greater name recognition than Robert Barnes, but few lived as aggressive or colorful life than the Austin...

Operation Valkyrie, 1944

Week of July 3
In ancient Norse mythology, Valkyries were goddesses, appearing as female warriors who attended battlefields to escort the souls of the slain to one of two destinations in the afterlife, half...

The Declaration of Independence, 1776

Week of July 3
The Declaration of Independence is just that—a declaration of formal separation or secession from Great Britain, the final wording approved by the Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776...

The Coronation of Queen Victoria, 1837

Week of June 26
Eighteen years old, five feet tall, and eventually the mother of nine children, she became the most powerful woman on earth. Queen Victoria reigned in England for sixty-three-and-a-half years...

The Battle of Waterloo, 1815

Week of June 12
No individual in history so dominated the continent of Europe as did Napoleon Bonaparte from 1800-1815. He seemed to be the embodiment of the “Great Man Theory” that became prominent in the...

The Founding of the YMCA, 1844

Week of June 5
Throughout the 19th Century, millions of people, especially in the English speaking world, moved from farm to city, from rural to urban areas, causing great social upheaval and the exponential growth...

The Battle of Tsushima Ends, 1905

Week of May 29
The military history of the Far East had little resonance or study in the West prior to the 20th Century. Japan was not open to Western contact until the 1850s, and China remained…

John Brown the Domestic Terrorist, 1856

Week of May 22
The turbulent decade of the 1850s witnessed the attempts by the people of Kansas and Nebraska (1854) to organize formally as territories, looking forward to eventual statehood. Southern…

The Plessy v. Ferguson Case Decided, 1896

Week of May 15
Supreme Court rulings look like the Friday night boxing card between two pugilists, usually destined for future anonymity, but temporarily the main event for entertainment. And so it is with many of those…

Crazy Horse Surrenders, 1877

Week of May 1
Census data, missionary tales, soldiers’ letters and diaries, government documents of all sorts, photographs, and the impressions of enemies have been most often used in the past to tell the…

Edward I Invades Scotland, 1297

Week of April 24
Edward towered over his contemporaries at 6’2”. He thus received the nickname of “Longshanks,” by which history has since known him. He also got the sobriquet, “The Hammer of the Scots,” from later…

The Siege of Derry Begins, 1689

Week of April 17
Nations of the world often have some great battle or last stand or heroic deeds that everyone learns about in popular culture and family lore. Sometimes the event achieves a mythological status, the…

The Edict of Nantes Proclaimed, 1598

Week of April 10
Several of the greatest preachers, evangelists and theologians of the Protestant Reformation were born in France, often writing in French as well as Latin. They pastored churches in France…

Julius Caesar’s Assassination, 44 BC

Week of March 13
Cum esset Caesar in citeriore Gallia. . . and so begins De Bello Gallico, The War in Gaul by Julius Caesar. It has often been the first Latin translated by every school-boy and girl for hundreds of years...

The Final Sinking of the CSS Hunley, 1864

Week of February 13
A bumper sticker I observed in Charleston, South Carolina a number of years ago read: “There are only two kinds of ships: submarines and targets.” How appropriate to see that sign in Charleston, for...

The End of the Punic Wars, 146 BC

Week of January 31
The conquest of Europe and the Mediterranean world by Rome did not happen overnight. Defeating the tribes and enemies of the Italian peninsula may have come easily, but the challenge of Carthage...

The Birth of Robert E. Lee, 1807

Week of January 17
Robert Edward Lee’s father was a great cavalry commander and hero of the Revolutionary War, General Henry, “Light-Horse Harry,” Lee III. Upon the death of George Washington, Henry Lee...

The Secession of Florida, 1861

Week of January 9
The State of Florida is no stranger to controversy. They are in the news today because of the high value the governor places on personal liberty and Constitutional fidelity. It is not the first time...

The Battle of New Orleans, 1815

Week of January 2
If ever there was an international city in America, New Orleans was it. The city was founded by the French Mississippi Company in 1718, ceded to Spain as a result of the French and Indian War...